North Carolina

  • June 11, 2024

    Insurer Given Early Exit From Contractor's Cost Overrun Suit

    An insurance company was axed Monday from a general contractor's $8.5 million lawsuit against a developer seeking payment for its work building an apartment complex, with a North Carolina state court judge ruling it was too soon to rope in the insurer.

  • June 11, 2024

    NCAA Hit With NIL Suit By '83 Wolfpack Players

    Members of North Carolina State University's 1983 championship basketball team have accused the National Collegiate Athletic Association of exploiting their names, images and likenesses for profit.

  • June 11, 2024

    NC Truck Drivers Get $242K Atty Fee In Wage Suit Deal

    A North Carolina federal judge has awarded a class of truck drivers for a shredding company just under $242,000 in attorney fees on top of a $725,000 settlement to resolve claims the company deducted pay for meal breaks they did not take.

  • June 11, 2024

    FTC Gets Short Extension On Novant Deal Pause

    A North Carolina federal court Tuesday extended an order preventing Novant Health from closing its $320 million deal for a pair of hospitals in the state by 10 days to give the Federal Trade Commission time to ask the Fourth Circuit to pause the transaction.

  • June 11, 2024

    4th Circ. Unconvinced Migrant Siblings' Abuse Was Retaliatory

    The Fourth Circuit has refused to revive an asylum application from two Salvadoran siblings fleeing an abusive uncle, unconvinced that the uncle had targeted the pair in retaliation for their mother's reporting him to the police.

  • June 11, 2024

    NC Hair Braiding Biz Loses H-2B Bid Over Year-Round Need

    A North Carolina hair braiding business won't be able to hire three shampoo assistants after a U.S. Department of Labor appeals board found that an increase in business doesn't qualify as temporary need under the H-2B temporary foreign labor program.

  • June 11, 2024

    Atty, Broker Look To Dismantle Guilty Verdicts In Tax Case

    A St. Louis attorney convicted alongside his daughter and a North Carolina insurance agent asked Tuesday to be acquitted for their roles in a $4 million tax fraud scheme, arguing in part that the supposedly false statements they made on tax returns were actually true.

  • June 11, 2024

    Singleton Schreiber Adds Tribal And Environmental Law Pro

    Plaintiffs firm Singleton Schreiber has hired a Florida attorney focused on advocating for Native American tribes to its tribal litigation practice and climate change litigation practice as senior counsel, the firm has announced.

  • June 11, 2024

    J&J Inks $700M Deal To End AGs' Talc Marketing Suits

    Forty-three state attorneys general on Tuesday said there has been a $700 million nationwide settlement and a consent judgment has been reached with Johnson & Johnson that ends claims it misled consumers about the safety of its talc products.

  • June 11, 2024

    Wilson Elser Attys Officially Exit Airline Suit After Filing Gaffe

    A Texas state judge has approved American Airlines' request for the departure of its Wilson Elser Moskowitz Edelman & Dicker LLP legal team that blamed a young child for a then-flight attendant's alleged covert bathroom recording, a week after the same lawyers were replaced from a similar suit in North Carolina federal court.

  • June 10, 2024

    Triumph Motorcycles Hit With Complaint Over Defective Brakes

    An Iowa resident has accused a Georgia-based motorcycle company of putting defective brakes on a bike that caused him to sustain permanent brain injuries after he was unexpectedly thrown from the vehicle, in a complaint filed in North Carolina federal court.

  • June 10, 2024

    Split 4th Circ. Tosses Suit Over 'Forever Chemicals' In NC

    The Fourth Circuit ruled Monday that environmental groups couldn't challenge in district court the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's selection of particular so-called forever chemicals for testing after the agency agreed, at the groups' request, to research the chemicals' effects in North Carolina.

  • June 10, 2024

    Goldberg Segalla Adds Toxic Torts, Workers' Comp Attys

    Goldberg Segalla LLP has added two attorneys working in practice areas such as toxic torts and workers' compensation as partners in its offices in Manhattan and Garden City, New York, the firm announced Monday.

  • June 10, 2024

    FTC To Fight Go-Ahead Order On Novant $320M Hospital Deal

    Just days after a district court loss, the Federal Trade Commission said Monday it will ask the Fourth Circuit to step in and block Novant Health from buying two North Carolina hospitals in a $320 million deal the agency contends would harm competition.

  • June 10, 2024

    Justices Call For Do-Over In 9th Circ. Bank Preemption Case

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday tossed a Ninth Circuit decision rejecting federal preemption of a California state interest-on-escrow law for Flagstar Bank, ordering a do-over in the case following the high court's recent ruling on preemption standards in a similar case involving Bank of America.

  • June 10, 2024

    Contractor Can Replead Claims In $115M City Streetcar Suit

    A contractor suing the city of Charlotte for $115 million over alleged cost overruns and delays on a streetcar line construction project will have another shot at pleading its contract claims after a North Carolina Business Court judge cleared the path to file an amended complaint.

  • June 07, 2024

    Pedicure Chair Co. Settles Patent Suits With Nail Salon, Seller

    A company that sells pedicure chairs has reached settlements in litigation accusing a North Carolina nail salon and a Texas spa furniture retailer of using and selling chairs that infringe its patent.

  • June 07, 2024

    Lumbee Tribe Family Says Bias Sunk Home Rental Application

    A family of Lumbee Native American tribe members has alleged that a national real estate rental company violated the Fair Housing Act's anti-discrimination provisions by denying their housing application based on the father's single criminal conviction without giving him a chance to appeal.

  • June 07, 2024

    Contractor Claims No Bad Intentions In Talking To Juror

    A general contractor has doubled down on his bid to throw out a contempt conviction for talking to a juror before his suit was officially settled, telling a North Carolina appeals court he genuinely believed the case was over and didn't intend to disrupt the court or violate any order.

  • June 07, 2024

    FCA, Cummins' $6M Engine Defect Deal Gets OK'd

    A Michigan federal judge gave the go-ahead Friday to a $6 million settlement to resolve claims that Cummins Inc. made defective engines that went into FCA US LLC's Dodge Ram vehicles. FCA, now part of Stellantis NV, was once better known as Fiat Chrysler Automobiles NV.

  • June 07, 2024

    Support Co. Can't Revive Suit Blaming Lindberg For Lost Biz

    A customer support company that claimed its ties to convicted insurance mogul Greg E. Lindberg cost it an important client can't revive a fraudulent concealment suit, with the Fourth Circuit ruling Friday that Lindberg wasn't obligated to disclose his criminal conduct.

  • June 07, 2024

    Court Software Co., NC Sheriff Fight To Exit Civil Rights Action

    Texas-based software company Tyler Technologies and a North Carolina sheriff continued their push this week to escape a proposed class action alleging North Carolina's new digital court system led to wrongful arrests and extended jail time.

  • June 07, 2024

    NBA Star Won't Raise $1.5M Fee Bid After 4th Circ. Win

    NBA star Zion Williamson told a North Carolina federal court that he's still only asking for $1.5 million in attorney fees despite having undertaken more litigation in a Fourth Circuit battle over a contract with his former agent.

  • June 06, 2024

    Fintech Lender Ran 'Bait & Switch' With Borrowers, Suit Says

    Fintech company Figure Lending LLC faces a proposed class action alleging its home equity lines of credit are actually intentionally mislabeled home equity loans with higher interest rates and fees.

  • June 06, 2024

    Camp Lejeune Deals Worth $14.4M So Far, Government Says

    There have been 58 settlements worth a total of $14.4 million so far in a North Carolina federal court alleging injuries caused by decades-long water contamination at Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune between February 2023 and June 4, according to a joint status report filed by the two sides.

Expert Analysis

  • Lean Into The 'Great Restoration' To Retain Legal Talent

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    As the “great resignation,” in which employees voluntarily left their jobs in droves, has largely dissipated, legal employers should now work toward the idea of a “great restoration,” adopting strategies to effectively hire, onboard and retain top legal talent, says Molly McGrath at Hiring & Empowering Solutions.

  • Live Nation May Shake It Off In A Long Game With The DOJ

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    Don't expect a swift resolution in the U.S. Department of Justice's case against Live Nation, but a long litigation, with the company likely to represent itself as the creator of a competitive ecosystem, and the government faced with explaining how the ticketing giant formed under its watch, say Thomas Kliebhan and Taylor Hixon at GRSM50.

  • Series

    Fishing Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Atop the list of ways fishing makes me a better lawyer is the relief it offers from the chronic stress of a demanding caseload, but it has also improved my listening skills and patience, and has served as an exceptional setting for building earnest relationships, says Steven DeGeorge​​​​​​​ at Robinson Bradshaw.

  • A Healthier Legal Industry Starts With Emotional Intelligence

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    The legal profession has long been plagued by high rates of mental health issues, in part due to attorneys’ early training and broader societal stereotypes — but developing one’s emotional intelligence is one way to foster positive change, collectively and individually, says attorney Esperanza Franco.

  • To Make Your Legal Writing Clear, Emulate A Master Chef

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    To deliver clear and effective written advocacy, lawyers should follow the model of a fine dining chef — seasoning a foundation of pure facts with punchy descriptors, spicing it up with analogies, refining the recipe and trimming the fat — thus catering to a sophisticated audience of decision-makers, says Reuben Guttman at Guttman Buschner.

  • What Junk Fee Law Means For Biz In California And Beyond

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    Come July 1, companies doing business in California must ensure that the price of any good or service as offered, displayed or advertised is inclusive of all mandatory fees and other charges in compliance with S.B. 478, which may have a far-reaching impact across the country due to wide applicability, say Alexandria Ruiz and Amy Lally at Sidley Austin.

  • Circuit Judge Writes An Opinion, AI Helps: What Now?

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    Last week's Eleventh Circuit opinion in Snell v. United Specialty Insurance, notable for a concurrence outlining the use of artificial intelligence to evaluate a term's common meaning, is hopefully the first step toward developing a coherent basis for the judiciary's generative AI use, says David Zaslowsky at Baker McKenzie.

  • Perspectives

    Trauma-Informed Legal Approaches For Pro Bono Attorneys

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    As National Trauma Awareness Month ends, pro bono attorneys should nevertheless continue to acknowledge the mental and physical effects of trauma, allowing them to better represent clients, and protect themselves from compassion fatigue and burnout, say Katherine Cronin at Stinson and Katharine Manning at Blackbird.

  • Series

    Playing Music Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    My deep and passionate involvement in playing, writing and producing music equipped me with skills — like creativity, improvisation and problem-solving — that contribute to the success of my legal career, says attorney Kenneth Greene.

  • How Attys Can Avoid Pitfalls When Withdrawing From A Case

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    The Trump campaign's recent scuffle over its bid to replace its counsel in a pregnancy retaliation suit offers a chance to remind attorneys that many troubles inherent in withdrawing from a case can be mitigated or entirely avoided by communicating with clients openly and frequently, says Christopher Konneker at Orsinger Nelson.

  • Using A Children's Book Approach In Firm Marketing Content

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    From “The Giving Tree” to “Where the Wild Things Are,” most children’s books are easy to remember because they use simple words and numbers to tell stories with a human impact — a formula law firms should emulate in their marketing content to stay front of mind for potential clients, says Seema Desai Maglio at The Found Word.

  • What The FTC Report On AG Collabs Means For Cos.

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    The Federal Trade Commission's April report on working with state attorneys general shows collaboration can increase efficiency and consistency in how statutes are interpreted and enforced, which can minimize the likelihood of requests for inconsistent injunctive relief that can create operational problems for businesses, say attorneys at Kelley Drye.

  • When Oral Settlements Reached In Mediation Are Enforceable

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    A recent decision by the New Jersey Appellate Division illustrates the difficulties that may arise in trying to enforce an oral settlement agreement reached in mediation, but adherence to certain practices can improve the likelihood that such an agreement will be binding, says Richard Mason at MasonADR.

  • Series

    Being An EMT Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    While some of my experiences as an emergency medical technician have been unusually painful and searing, the skills I’ve learned — such as triage, empathy and preparedness — are just as useful in my work as a restructuring lawyer, says Marshall Huebner at Davis Polk.

  • Perspectives

    Public Interest Attorneys Are Key To Preserving Voting Rights

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    Fourteen states passed laws restricting or limiting voting access last year, highlighting the need to support public interest lawyers who serve as bulwarks against such antidemocratic actions — especially in an election year, says Verna Williams at Equal Justice Works.

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